Friday, June 5, 2020

You’ve Goat This: Wisdom to Get You Through the Good, Baaad, and Everything in Between


You’ve Goat This:
Wisdom to Get You Through the Good, the Baaad, and Everything in Between
Featuring Heartwarming Photos of the Adult and Baby Goat StarsGuaranteed to Give Everyone in the Family a Big Smile!

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Given the stressful times we’re living in, it’s no surprise that adorable animal photos are in high demand. But while puppies and kittens have little to add, good-natured goats have it all and can teach us to take life by the horns! With their philosopher’s beards, stately horns, and outgoing charm, these versatile animals know that working hard is just as important as cuddling up. Whether they are hopping up the peaks of mountains, through the treetops, or onto the backs of cows, goats are natural masters of balance, famed for their brains, brawn, and bawdy good humor.

In You’ve Goat This: Wisdom to Get You Through the Good, Baaad, and Everything in Between (Apollo Publishers; June 9; Hardcover: $17.99/ISBN: 978-19480-6250-3), the wily, lovable stars of the Instagram sensation Goats Gone Grazing Acres (38,500 followers) are featured in vibrant, smile-inducing full-color photos taken on their Kentucky farm, along with inspirational quotes on everything from health, romance, family, and work to finding yourself and learning to stop being riddled by your human insecurities.

The book, sure to brighten any darkened day, brims with:
  • Photos divided into chapters such as: Ewe Can Do It!, Thinking Outside the Barn, The Udder Half, and much more!
  • Quotes from the likes of Joan Rivers (“I don’t exercise. If God wanted me to bend over, he would have put diamonds on the floor.”), Blake Lively (“It’s the choice you have to wake up every day and say, “There’s no reason today can’t be the best day of my life.”), Mr. T (“I pity the fool who just gives up.”), and many more!
  • 200 photos of goats paired with motivating quotes on staying true to yourself and living life to the fullest.
GOATS GONE GRAZING ACRES, based in Western Kentucky, is a small, loving goat farm run by former city folk Jessi and Josh Pottebaum. They opened their doors in 2009 with two goats, Suzie Q and Sophie Lou, and now care for 54 goats, whose pictures have gone viral on Instagram (@goats_gone_grazing_acres) and been featured in Buzzfeed and Mashable.

Saturday, May 30, 2020

Requirements for U.S. meat slaughter and processing outlined in June 3 webinar


By Sarah Cato
U of A System Division of Agriculture

Fast facts:
·       National Agricultural Law Center webinar to discuss oversight, requirements for meat slaughter and processing in the U.S.
·       Webinar is June 3 at noon to 1 p.m. EDT
·       Register online at https://bit.ly/2y9P3qG


FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. – With meat and poultry processing crippled by COVID-19 closures, some producers with a backlog of animals are seeking other means to process their stock, including smaller processing facilities. Additionally, interest is growing in the necessary steps to open and maintain these types of facilities. However, there are numerous considerations for both groups to examine, Elizabeth Rumley, a Senior Staff Attorney at the National Agricultural Law Center, said.

Slaughter and processing facilities must meet sanitation, building, and sometimes inspection requirements, which differ depending on the services the facility provides, who its customers are and in what state it operates.

Livestock processing in the United States is regulated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Safety Inspection Service, or USDA-FSIS. That authority may be delegated to a state agency, if that state chooses to apply for it, as long as the state requirements are “at least equal to” those enforced by USDA-FSIS.

Federal vs. state
“State inspection programs add another layer of laws and regulations to meat and poultry processing requirements in those states that have implemented them,” Rumley said. “The substantive difference between the state and federal inspection is that that state programs, with some exceptions, only allow for meat processed in these facilities to be sold within the state, while FSIS inspected facilities can export meat to other states and countries.”

Rumley added that these differences go one step further once the type of facility is considered.

“Exceptions and exclusions such as those for custom slaughter plants and small poultry processing facilities may change the processing oversight and requirements even further,” she said.

To help individuals navigate the complexity of the requirements for slaughter and processing facilities, the National Agricultural Law Center is hosting a free webinar to discuss the agencies with authority over the slaughter and processing of meat and poultry, differences between state and federal oversight, proposed federal legislation that may change processing requirements and additional challenges facing small meat processors.

The webinar will be held June 3 at noon EDT/11 a.m. CDT, and will be led by Elizabeth Rumley and NALC Senior Staff Attorney Rusty Rumley.

Register online for the webinar at https://bit.ly/2y9P3qG.

For more information on meat processing laws in the United States, visit https://bit.ly/2SEz4bj.

To see more about the economics of COVID-19 and meat processing, visit https://bit.ly/2XiWCnt.

For more information on the National Agricultural Law Center, visit https://nationalaglawcenter.org/ or follow @Nataglaw on Twitter.

About the National Agricultural Law Center
The National Agricultural Law Center serves as the nation’s leading source of agricultural and food law research and information. The Center works with producers, state and federal policymakers, Congressional staffers, attorneys, land grant universities, and many others to provide objective, nonpartisan agricultural and food law research and information to the nation’s agricultural community.
The Center is a unit of the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture and works in close partnership with the USDA Agricultural Research Service, National Agricultural Library.
About the Division of Agriculture
The University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture’s mission is to strengthen agriculture, communities, and families by connecting trusted research to the adoption of best practices. Through the Agricultural Experiment Station and the Cooperative Extension Service, the Division of Agriculture conducts research and extension work within the nation’s historic land grant education system.

The Division of Agriculture is one of 20 entities within the University of Arkansas System. It has offices in all 75 counties in Arkansas and faculty on five system campuses. 

The University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture is an equal opportunity/equal access/affirmative action institution. If you require a reasonable accommodation to participate or need materials in another format, please contact 479-575-4607 as soon as possible. Dial 711 for Arkansas Relay. 

Wednesday, April 8, 2020

U of A Division of Agriculture releases 3-minute videos explaining on-farm COVID-19 safety measures




By Ryan McGeeney
U of A System Division of Agriculture

Fast Facts:


(190 words)

LITTLE ROCK — While many businesses have closed or moved employee interactions online, much of the world depends on farmers remaining on the job — and in the field. 
The University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture has released two videos explaining practical, common-sense safety precautions for anyone working in an agricultural production environment. One video is in English, the other in Spanish.
The precautions are specifically aimed at helping farmers protect themselves and their coworkers from COVID-19, and to slow the spread of the virus.
The English language video features Jarrod Hardke, rice agronomist for the Division of Agriculture; the Spanish language version features Eduardo Castaneda, a program associate with the Division of Agriculture’s Rice Research and Extension Center in Stuttgart, Ark.
Each video explains the importance of social distancing during tailgate meetings, sanitizing equipment before and after use and other safety behaviors in about three minutes.
The English version, “Staying Safe on the Farm through COVID-19,” can be viewed at https://bit.ly/UAEX-COVID19-Farms-English.

The Spanish version, “Mantenerse Seguro en la Granja a Través de COVID-19,” can be viewed at https://bit.ly/UAEX-COVID19-Farms-Español.

For information and resources on COVID-19 for families, businesses and others, visit https://uaex.edu/covid-19.   

To learn about extension programs in Arkansas, contact your local Cooperative Extension Service agent or visit www.uaex.edu. Follow us on Twitter at @UAEX_edu.

About the Division of Agriculture
The University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture’s mission is to strengthen agriculture, communities, and families by connecting trusted research to the adoption of best practices. Through the Agricultural Experiment Station and the Cooperative Extension Service, the Division of Agriculture conducts research and extension work within the nation’s historic land grant education system. 

The Division of Agriculture is one of 20 entities within the University of Arkansas System. It has offices in all 75 counties in Arkansas and faculty on five system campuses.  

The University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture offers all its Extension and Research programs to all eligible persons without regard to race, color, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, national origin, religion, age, disability, marital or veteran status, genetic information, or any other legally protected status, and is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.